IBM RFT is well suited for regression and functional testing.  It is a data-driven testing platform that supports applications like .Net, Java, SAP, Flex, and Ajax.  The scripting languages used by RFT are .Net and Java. One of the unique features of IBM RFT is Storyboard testing which simplifies test visualization by recording and visualizing user actions with the help of application screenshots in a storyboard format. It also allows editing using natural language. It also offers integration with IBM Jazz application lifecycle management like IBM Rotational Team Concert and Rational Quality Manager.
We are running a local gardening service business, and weren’t exactly lucky picking up a standalone billing service. We looked mostly at tools with multiple levels of service, but we couldn’t find an SMB-friendly plan that automates accounts payable. Pay-as-you-go was not an option either, as we’re working more or less with the same clients. Which system would you suggest?
GetResponse is best known as an email marketing platform, but they’ve expanded their offerings significantly in the past couple of years with CRM, webinars, and marketing automation tools. The GetResponse marketing automation is built around drag-and-drop workflows that you can set up to mimic customer journeys through your website and toward conversion.
Unified Functional Testing (UFT) is a well-known commercial testing tool for functional testing. It provides a comprehensive feature set for API, web services, and GUI testing of desktop, web, and mobile applications across platforms. The tool has advanced image-based object recognition feature, reusable test components, and automated documentation.

To keep track of our ever-growing suite of tests, we also classify the automation status of our tests ("already automated," "blocked," "cannot be automated," "in progress," "to be automated") and define the scope of each test (API, integration, user interface, end-to-end, etc.) Note that we have recognized that not all tests should (or can) be automated.
This article uses the term “tester” to refer to the person involved in testing software with automation tools. It is not meant to distinguish by job title or technical proficiency. Jim Hazen describes himself as a hybrid, or “technical tester,” because he can write test scripts and develop what he refers to as “testware.” The trend is to hire for multiple skillsets, but that does not mean the non-technical stakeholders involved in software development don’t benefit from automation testing.

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