Eventually, someone has to write the code. Even if the record/playback tool claims to be codeless, sooner or later your software will produce dates that need to be compared to today's date and formatted, and you'll need to drop down into some kind of code editor. The person writing the code is probably not a professional programmer, but even were that so, it is tempting to focus more on getting the code done than on doing it well.


With the growing number of web-based applications this is changing, however, as verifying and testing web-based interfaces is easier and there are various tools that help with this, including free open source projects. Please see below for a list of popular and useful tools, projects, books and resources to get started with automated software testing.
This article uses the term “tester” to refer to the person involved in testing software with automation tools. It is not meant to distinguish by job title or technical proficiency. Jim Hazen describes himself as a hybrid, or “technical tester,” because he can write test scripts and develop what he refers to as “testware.” The trend is to hire for multiple skillsets, but that does not mean the non-technical stakeholders involved in software development don’t benefit from automation testing.

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