Those who believe they will be actively customizing their automated test environments may want to start with Selenium and customize it from there, whereas those who want to begin in a more structured test environment may be better off with one of the systems that are built on top of Selenium. Selenium can be scripted in a multitude of languages, including Java, Python, PHP, C#, and Perl.
You may have noticed that many of these solutions are either built on top of or compatible with Selenium testing. Selenium is undoubtedly the most popular automated security testing framework for web applications. However, it has been extended quite often to add functionality to its core. Selenium is used in everything from Katalon Studio to Robot Framework, but alone, it is primarily a browser automation product.

An important part of UI testing is verifying typical use cases. For example, a typical use case for a hotel booking website includes searching for an available room, selecting one, entering reservation details, and confirming the booking. When the test should be successful for the data values provided, it is called a “happy path scenario.” Functional testing also validates the behavior of the application when no rooms are available for the desired date (the “sad path”) as well as when the user enters out-of-range dates for a reservation or an invalid credit card number (the “bad path”). Ranorex Studio’s data-driven testing automates the process of repeating a test for multiple data values so you can effortlessly cover the happy path, sad path, and bad path. Data values can be retrieved from an internal data table, external Excel file or SQL table. Since the test data is stored separately from the test procedure, adding or changing scenarios is a snap. For more complex scenarios, Ranorex Studio supports local and global parameters, keyword-driven testing, and conditional test execution.

The mobile android testing kit is continuously updated, so you’ll always have the most recent equipment and OS iterations for each mobile device testing session, and you can test crosswise over gadgets without content alterations. Movement logs, charges, screen captures and metadata are all automatically created, so you’ll have all the metrics you could conceivably need.


This article uses the term “tester” to refer to the person involved in testing software with automation tools. It is not meant to distinguish by job title or technical proficiency. Jim Hazen describes himself as a hybrid, or “technical tester,” because he can write test scripts and develop what he refers to as “testware.” The trend is to hire for multiple skillsets, but that does not mean the non-technical stakeholders involved in software development don’t benefit from automation testing.

ubot studio

×