With KashFlow accounting software for small businesses, you can invoice your customers, reconcile bank transactions, accept invoice payments online and generate more than 50 reports. The software includes a mobile app for Android and iOS, and integrations are available. It can be used by businesses in many countries, including the U.S., but its payroll features are exclusive to U.K.-based businesses. kashflow.com
Katalon Studio is a unique tool that is designed to be run both by automation testers and programmers and developers. There are different levels of testing skill set available, and the testing processes include the ability to automate tests across mobile applications, web services, and web applications. Katalon Studio is built on top of Appium and Selenium, and consequently offers much of the functionality of these solutions.
Small business accounting is an area where there's still a lot of competition, which is healthy, but it makes your decision-making process harder. Consider the chart above and click through to the full reviews, take a look at the screenshots, and take advantage of the free trials offered. What you choose now may or may not be what you need in five years, but the landscape will look different by then. So pick the best match for your current circumstances and dive in!

So what should small businesses look for in such an app? For starters, ease-of-use, integration and security should be taken into consideration. However, what counts most is the pricing. As most of these players are on a tight budget, we recommend that they subscribe to a cloud-based solution as they provide customized processes, integrations and pricing flexibility.

You try to enter random data in this form which took around 20 minutes. Then you press submit. Wolla!! An error message is shown which looks like an unhandled exception. You become very happy. You proudly note down the steps and report the bug in your bug management system. Great effort, you feel really confident and energetic. You continue the testing until the day ends and find some more bugs. “Amazing first day”, you thought.
An important part of UI testing is verifying typical use cases. For example, a typical use case for a hotel booking website includes searching for an available room, selecting one, entering reservation details, and confirming the booking. When the test should be successful for the data values provided, it is called a “happy path scenario.” Functional testing also validates the behavior of the application when no rooms are available for the desired date (the “sad path”) as well as when the user enters out-of-range dates for a reservation or an invalid credit card number (the “bad path”). Ranorex Studio’s data-driven testing automates the process of repeating a test for multiple data values so you can effortlessly cover the happy path, sad path, and bad path. Data values can be retrieved from an internal data table, external Excel file or SQL table. Since the test data is stored separately from the test procedure, adding or changing scenarios is a snap. For more complex scenarios, Ranorex Studio supports local and global parameters, keyword-driven testing, and conditional test execution.
TestComplete provides an open platform for you to easily build continuous testing frameworks to test non-stop with a runtime engine and distributed testing. Execute a faster continuous delivery process by automating GUI tests on remote computers and synchronizing test projects on the go. Unlike other automated tools, TestComplete enables continuous testing with integrations to top CI systems like Jenkins, and SCMs like Git.
Running a small business is hard and challenging. Many don’t survive past the first, few years. Using the right apps can make a big difference in helping you overcome the basic issues that every small business owners runs into when they have their own operation. They help you get organized, streamline your workflows, and get more done with greater efficiency and reliability.
In this article, I'll discuss some of the best practices I discovered through on my own journey toward automation. These are practices you should consider when automating your testing cycles to make sure you build a suite of tests that work well and can be maintained throughout the life of your application. (This article is based on a presentation that can be viewed in full here.)
During a recent consulting assignment, a tester told me he spent 90 percent of his time setting up test conditions. The application allowed colleges and other large organizations to configure their workflow for payment processing. One school might set up self-service kiosks, while another might have a cash window where the teller could only authorize up to a certain dollar amount. Still others might require a manager to cancel or approve a transaction over a certain dollar amount. Some schools took certain credit cards, while others accepted cash only. To reproduce any of these conditions, the tester had to log in, create a workflow manually, and establish a set of users with the right permissions before finally doing the testing. When we talked about automation approaches, our initial conversation was about tools to drive the user interface. For example, a batch script like this:
Really small businesses need really simple accounting software. Zoho Books offers all of the basic features microbusinesses need as well as advanced tools and integrations so you can continue using the software as your business grows. Furthermore, compared with other accounting software for really small businesses, Zoho Books has the best price for all of its capabilities. [Go here for a full review of Zoho Books.]

A subscription to Xero runs varies depending on the plan you choose. Xero will handle five invoices for you, pay five bills and reconcile up to 20 transactions a month with the starter version. You get unlimited reconciliations, invoices and bills with the Standard or Premium plans, and the Premium plan will also handle payroll for you. You’re not locked into the plan you choose — you can change at any time.
The main goal in software development processes is to satisfy customers with timely releases of software that works flawlessly. Test automation makes it possible to execute test cases during off-peak hours, and to distribute them in parallel across multiple physical or virtual servers. Automated tests complete in a fraction of the time required for manual testing, giving the team significantly faster feedback on the quality of the application and its suitability for release.
While automated testing has been considered essential for organizations, both large and small, to implement in order to deliver outstanding software and stay competitive in the industry, it can be tough to get started. Outlining an effective roadmap, building robust frameworks, choosing the right tools, and measuring the potential monetary impact that automation could have on your delivery lifecycle are all critical components of any successful automated testing strategy, but each step presents its own challenges and costs.
You already know the value of software testing. But fast-paced software development environments can create time and cost constraints that make it difficult to thoroughly test an application prior to release. If defects slip undetected into the production environment, the result can be customer dissatisfaction and increased maintenance costs. Test automation allows your team to execute more tests in less time, increasing coverage and freeing human testers to do more high-level, exploratory testing. Automation is especially beneficial for test cases that are executed repeatedly, such as those for cross-browser and cross-device compatibility, and those that are part of a full or partial regression suite.
The move to agile has led many teams to adopt a pyramid testing strategy. The test automation pyramid strategy calls for automating tests at three different levels. Unit testing represents the base and biggest percentage of this test automation pyramid. Next comes, service layer, or API testing. And finally, GUI tests sit at the top. The pyramid looks something like this:
Welcome to our free online programming courses. We’ve created these courses to facilitate the training we offer in the Automation in Testing namespace, but also to provide free high quality resources to the testing and software development community. Our current courses can be broken down into three categories, Programming Basics, Language Basics and Selenium WebDriver. We hope to get some video versions of these courses made this year and those will be available on the Ministry of Testing Dojo.

With tools like TestComplete, the evolution from manual to automated testing does not have to be difficult. By allowing you to see every action you make, either while generating test code or in administering tests, manual testers can see exactly where to make adjustments while they’re learning. After using automated testing tools and techniques, manual testing has proven to be an effective way of double-checking the software to make sure there is no stone left unturned. In that sense, manual and automated testing go hand-in-hand and, when used properly, can ensure that the final product is as good as it can be.


Like Zoho Books, Wave Accounting is geared toward smaller businesses, those with no more than 10 employees. The average Zoho Books client employs three to five workers. It’s also more appropriate for service businesses than retail businesses. It can’t handle a lot in the way of inventory, and you’d have to upgrade for the ability to process credit card payments. The same goes for added payroll features. This upgraded version isn’t free, but the cost is nominal.
Gauge is produced by the same company that developed Selenium. With Gauge, developers can use C#, Ruby, or Java to create automated tests Gauge itself is an extensible program that has plug-in support, but it is still in beta; use this only if you want to adopt cutting-edge technology now. Gauge is a promising product and when it is complete will likely become a standard, both for developers and testers, as it has quite a lot of technology behind it.
Paying bills isn't as much fun as sending out invoices, but it has to be done. You may already be managing this task through your bank's website, which may or may not excel at this service. There are few other options online for standalone bill-pay, and the ones that exist have restrictions. Bill.com rules when it comes to supporting both invoices and bills; you'll be charged $29 per user per month for payables automation only. If that's more than you want to pay, you could subscribe to Wave, which is free, and just use its bill-paying tools.
Building on these early successes with IBM, Hewlett-Packard and other early suppliers of business software solutions, corporate consumers demanded business software to replace the old-fashioned drafting board. CAD-CAM software (or computer-aided drafting for computer-aided manufacturing) arrived in the early 1980s. Also, project management software was so valued in the early 1980s that it might cost as much as $500,000 per copy (although such software typically had far fewer capabilities than modern project management software such as Microsoft Project, which one might purchase today for under $500 per copy.)

There’s nothing like having to handle several projects at the same time to test your organizational skills as a small business owner. While challenges are always good, your managing many tasks at once will only leave you drained and feeling swamped. Instead, rely on the following project management tools to ensure you can keep your project on target, and please your clients at the same time.

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