Intuit QuickBooks Online offers a range of features for all types of small businesses. This includes freelancers, consultants, online merchants, store and restaurant owners, service providers and more. Whether you're just starting out, expanding or have an established business, QuickBooks Online is packed with basic and advanced features to meet your accounting needs. [Go here for a full review of QuickBooks Online accounting software.]
TestCraft is a codeless Selenium test automation platform. The revolutionary AI technology and unique visual modeling allows for faster test creation and execution while eliminating test maintenance overhead. Testers create fully automated test scenarios without coding. Customers find bugs faster, release more frequently, integrate with CI/CD and improve overall quality of their digital products.

Built for small businesses to enterprises, EasyForm Expense Management provides users with an easy way to control, track, and manage their expenditures to enhance their bottom line. This online expense tracking and management solution paints a clear picture on all expenses through complete visibility on expense records and various reporting tools, such as category and split reports.


The software can be utilized in managing core HR processes like payroll, benefits administration and on-boarding, among many others. This web-based tool is highly-flexible and compatible with all popular browsers. It allows employees to check on all transactions and information related to their work. Managers can use the app to get pertinent information across all existing departments and applications. Errors and redundancies are minimized as the product makes use of a single record for each employee.
Friendly user interface and navigation. Cloud-based accounting applications—for the most part—look great. They're not as graphically rich as some types of online services, but they don't need to be. Graphics are used where it makes sense, like for displaying charts and graphs, and for invoice forms. Navigation and data entry take their cues from desktop software, using static and drop-down lists, icons and buttons, fill-in-the-blank fields, and toolbars.
This article uses the term “tester” to refer to the person involved in testing software with automation tools. It is not meant to distinguish by job title or technical proficiency. Jim Hazen describes himself as a hybrid, or “technical tester,” because he can write test scripts and develop what he refers to as “testware.” The trend is to hire for multiple skillsets, but that does not mean the non-technical stakeholders involved in software development don’t benefit from automation testing.

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