The medium size, or small and medium-sized enterprise (SME), has a broader range of software applications, ranging from accounting, groupware, customer relationship management, human resource management systems, outsourcing relationship management, loan origination software, shopping cart software, field service software, and other productivity enhancing applications.
Looking up the list, we’d probably begin with Wave – their billing & invoicing services may not have the bells & whistles QuickBooks does, and you may not be able to infuse that much branding material in your docs, but they’ll get the job done for free. Zoho Books is the next-to-the-best service, as it lets you bill 25 clients for as much as $9 a month. FreshBooks, QuickBooks, and Xero are slightly more expensive (pricing starts at $15) and restrict their low-tier package to a smaller number of billed clients, but they will suit you perfectly if you want to customize and categorize invoices, and to report on your billing activity.
Although this a complete list of the best software for small businesses in each of these categories, there might be other options that work better for your company. Click on the category headers below for a full list of available products. For personalized recommendations based on your business needs call one of our Technology Advisors at 877-822-9526 for a free, 5-minute consultation.
Hubspot calls themselves an inbound marketing and sales software, but the software modules come as stand alone or integrated marketing, CRM, and sales tools. The CRM is always free, and sales and marketing tools start at $0 and scale from there. From website building tools to lead generation and tracking modules and drip campaigns, Hubspot covers all the bases.

Automated testing expanded with Agile principles because testing in a repeatable manner that is secure, reliable, and keeps pace with the rapid deployment of software is required for this environment. In their book Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams, authors Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory claim Agile development depends on test automation to succeed. They emphasize the team effort required for test automation and recommend automating tests early in the development process. Also, the development of automation code is as important as the development of the actual production code for software. The “test-first" approach to development is known as Test-Driven Development.


However, as businesses grow, they’ll likely need to implement more controls over their business processes and better alignment between information and operational technologies. At this stage, they should consider investing in business process management software to help them standardize processes and workflows for multiple departments and improve operational performance. (Not to be confused with general "business managment" software, "business process management" software carries a more specific definition and set of technical requirements. Follow the link above to read our buyer's guide and learn more.)
Even the very smallest businesses need to keep track of their money, from payroll to taxes. In fact, many operate so close to the bone that every dollar is critical. Very small businesses and freelancers need accounting software at least as much as their larger counterparts. The problem is, what they need and what a bigger business needs are not the same thing at all. If you're a freelancer, contractor, or sole proprietor and you've tried a cloud-based accounting solution aimed at larger businesses in the past, you may have found that you're paying more than you want to for features that you don't really need. And maybe you went back to the old tried-and-true methods of keeping your books in a spreadsheet, or even in actual, literal books—made out of paper! It's easy to understand how that could happen, but it's a shame in this day and age not to take advantage of best-of-breed accounting software, wizard-based simplicity, access from anywhere, and the safety of an offsite backup.
Simple, familiar language. The principles of double-entry accounting are several centuries old. You can't get away from some of the terms and phrases that wouldn't normally come up in casual conversation, like debits and credits, general ledger, and chart of accounts. But the developers who have produced today's best-of-breed accounting sites only subject you to arcane language when it's absolutely necessary. You can't get around the fact that double-entry accounting is a complex process that must follow the rules, but these wizard-based services hide as much of the complexity as they can.
There's plenty of failure in that combination. First of all, the feedback loop from development to test is delayed. It is likely that the code doesn't have the hooks and affordances you need to test it. Element IDs might not be predictable, or might be tied to the database, for example. With one recent customer, we couldn't delete orders, and the system added a new order as a row at the bottom. Once we had 20 test runs, the new orders appeared on page two! That created a layer of back and forth where the code didn't do what it needed to do on the first pass. John Seddon, the British occupational psychologist, calls this "failure demand," which creates extra work (demand) on a system that only exists because the system failed the first time around.

TestPlant eggPlant is a niche tool that is designed to model the user’s POV and activity rather than simply scripting their actions. Testers can interact with the testing product as the end users would, making it easier for testers who may not have a development or programming background. TestPlant eggPlant can be used to create test cases and scenarios without any programming and can be integrated into lab management and CI solutions.
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