In a traditional environment, testing gets completed at the end of a development cycle. But as more and more companies move toward a DevOps and continuous delivery model in which software is constantly in development and must always be deployment-ready, leaving testing until the end no longer works. That’s where continuous testing comes in — to ensure quality at every stage of development.
Eventually, someone has to write the code. Even if the record/playback tool claims to be codeless, sooner or later your software will produce dates that need to be compared to today's date and formatted, and you'll need to drop down into some kind of code editor. The person writing the code is probably not a professional programmer, but even were that so, it is tempting to focus more on getting the code done than on doing it well.
As we can see, each of these automation tools has unique features to offer in addressing the growing challenges of software automation in the years ahead. Most provide capabilities for continuous testing and integration, test managementing, and reporting. They all support increasing automation needs for Web and Mobile testing. However, intelligent testing and smart analytics for adaptive and heterogeneous environments are still something to be desired for automation tools.
Check out some of the resources below or head over to our automated testing starter kit for more tips, resources, and tools for you to use to make your transformation seamless. You’ll find more information on what you should automate first, how to succeed when moving beyond manual testing, a downloadable guide to help you pick the right tool that fits your needs and an ROI calculator you can leverage to help your boss, or your team understand why automated testing is imperative.
With automated testing, that time is cut drastically. The work for automated testers is instead spent coding the tests and making improvements to these tests repeatedly as adjustments are needed. Once the test is complete, however, automated testing allows for the recycled use of tests so that they do not have to go through this whole process again. In essence, the time spent on the mundane tasks and repetition a manual tester would go through is instead spent focusing on larger, more important issues involving the software you’re developing.
This article uses the term “tester” to refer to the person involved in testing software with automation tools. It is not meant to distinguish by job title or technical proficiency. Jim Hazen describes himself as a hybrid, or “technical tester,” because he can write test scripts and develop what he refers to as “testware.” The trend is to hire for multiple skillsets, but that does not mean the non-technical stakeholders involved in software development don’t benefit from automation testing.

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